Winter Short Term

Application Deadline: September 15th 2024

Term overview

This two-week intensive program at the end of December/beginning of January takes place in the idyllic coastal town of Dingle – which just happens to be one of Ireland’s most popular New Year’s Eve destinations, welcoming thousands of people each year to ring in the new year with fireworks and a marching band parade. Dingle has all of the amenities of a tourist haven in an authentic Irish setting, bursting with traditional culture: music, language, food, and ‘craic’ (the Irish Gaelic term for ‘fun’)!

You will be welcomed with open arms by our SHU in Dingle team to enjoy the benefits of world-class teaching amidst gorgeous scenery and the warmth and festive spirit of Dingle at New Year’s. Ireland in winter enjoys a temperate climate, and when you are not partaking in the many indoor activities and events going on both in the classroom and around the town, you will be able to explore the wild Celtic landscape through tours among ruins, hiking, and horseback riding on the beach.

While the summer months are the busiest for tourism in Dingle, the Winter program offers you the unique ability to avail of all the entertainments and activities Dingle has to offer at festival time, but on an even more personal and immersive level. Dingle is one of the great Irish ‘Gaeltachts’, or traditional Irish Gaelic-speaking areas, attracting visitors from around the world each year seeking to partake of its storied character and charm. SHU in Dingle allows you to make it your Winter home!

Courses

BI 199/299 – TOMBS, RITUALS, & TRADITIONS
 
 
DESCRIPTION

The Dingle Peninsula has a rich assemblage of human history, from Mesolithic hunter-gatherers to early Christians, to modern-day. These time periods are abundantly represented by changing funeral rites throughout the Peninsula.

In this course, we’ll explore the prehistoric, ancient, and medieval people of the Dingle peninsula by examining the migration patterns and changing funeral and religious rites in the region. We’ll study and visit Neolithic stone megaliths and cairns as the humans of Dingle transitioned from hunting and gathering to farming, the wedge tombs and circle rock art of Dingle’s Bronze age inhabitants, and the changing funerary rites that accompanied the transition to Christianity in Dingle. We’ll use this information to explore and discuss how and why these monuments were made, both from a practical and a ritual standpoint.

FACULTY
Sarah Poniros Ph.D.
CMD 335/SLP 533 – CULTURAL & STRUCTURAL LINGUISTICS
 
 
DESCRIPTION

The connections between language, culture and social identify are strong. Cross-cultural variations in language are noted in differences in pronunciation, grammar and vocabulary by speakers of the same language. We will use structural and cultural linguistic frameworks to identify and understand differences in dialects of English spoken in Ireland and the United States.

FACULTY
Ciara Leydon Ph.D., CCC-SLP
HI 260 - IRISH PUBS, PINTS, AND POITÍN
 

 

DESCRIPTION

Pubs are one of the most important Irish institutions in Ireland. Irish culture has centered around three institutions: church, local GAA sports club, and the pub. Until the 1970s Mass attendance was nearly 95%, and involvement in national sports has been a widely supported, and after each of the events that included church or GAA everyone visited the pub afterwards where discussions, stories, and great ‘craic’ (fun) was experienced. With smaller homes and lack of many modern conveniences, pubs offer social spaces for sharing community knowledge and friendship, conducting business, playing music, and discussing politics.

Well beyond alcohol, the atmosphere, warmth and friendliness are a well-known aspect of Ireland; the 20th century has exported pubs around the world. Ireland has also excelled at brewing excellent ales, beers, and the word whiskey comes from the Irish ‘uisce beatha’ or water of life. This course studies the history and culture of the Irish Public House.

FACULTY

John B. Roney Ph.D.

HS 303/MPH 590 – HEALTH PROMOTION: FOOD, NUTRITION & SOCIETY
 
 
DESCRIPTION

Health education and promotion activities are increasingly supported by evidence showing positive impacts on various health indicators, as supported by contemporary research being performed in the Irish health sector. Using Irish population health goals as a framework, this course will use frequently occurring health conditions to explore health education models and health promotion interventions. Attention will also be given to measuring health and the impact of lifestyle choices on healthcare needs and costs within the context of ethical principles, with a special focus on food & diet.

Students will be introduced to the fundamental concepts of nutritional as a scientific, social, behavioral, and public health construct. During the course, students will experience the local nutritional scene in Dingle, Ireland. The exploration will include food markets, culinary venues, and review of national and local policies. Students will also learn how the built environment influences food choice and physical activity, and how the environmental differences between US and Dingle support or hinder healthy lifestyles

The course is open to graduate students and undergraduate students and as an MPH course, is not restricted to any specific major nor college.

 
FACULTY
Jacqueline Vernarelli Ph.D.
MK 299 – SUSTAINABLE TOURISM MARKETING
 
 
DESCRIPTION

Worldwide tourism is continuing to grow and has been identified as a critical industry for the economies of many different countries, each linking their attractions primarily to cultural identities. Ireland is one of the leading tourist destinations and the country’s tourist leaders have developed this position over decades as Ireland relies heavily on revenue generated from this source. It is estimated that overseas visitor numbers reached 6.29 million in 2011, a 7% increase from 2010. How does Ireland go about creating their specific brand image in marketing Ireland as a ‘holiday destination’? How have they created the Irish mystique that attracts so many tourists each year?

This class will explore these questions in developing a better understanding of tourism marketing and how Ireland has become a leader in this sector. The class will utilize a readings list, case studies, social media and site visits to explore this topic.

FACULTY
Enda McGovern Ph.D.
MU 106 – INTRODUCTION TO IRISH MUSIC
 
 
DESCRIPTION

This course provides students with a thorough overview of traditional Irish music, song and dance from their earliest references right up to today’s influence on the world music stage. Aural, as well as some basic traditional musicianship skills, will be developed over the course. Students will experience firsthand the Irish music scene locally.

Attendance at sessions and “céilís” will enable them to savor Traditional music in its natural social setting. The course will study the history and development of the tradition, while also ensuring the students gain a deeper understanding of this tradition by learning some practical skills.

FACULTY
Niamh Varian Barry MA
PH 271 – BIOETHICS: PHILOSOPHICAL APPROACHES
 
 
DESCRIPTION

Spend 2 weeks learning about ethical issues in health care by exploring compelling scenarios and case-studies. Study the role of ethics and the importance of Philosophy to the Irish Catholic Intellectual Tradition and investigate how health care concerns impact the lives of patients and health-care providers throughout southwestern Ireland.

Among the central topics to be covered include informed consent, medical futility, reproductive ethics, privacy, cultural competence, and clinical trials

FACULTY
Kevin J. Power Ph.D
TRS 271 – CELTIC RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS
 
 
DESCRIPTION

Study the ancient religion of Ireland, of gods and goddesses, ancestors and rituals, holy places and sacred rulers. Learn about the Celtic origins of Halloween, and the great seasonal festivals of the druids. Walk through the landscape and discover traditions and customs from ancient times that are reflected in the modern world, through myth, place names and customs.

FACULTY
Billy MagFhloin Ph.D.

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How to Apply

Tuition & Fees

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