Spring Semester

Application Deadline: October 15th 2024

Term overview

Welcome in the sunshine and festive fun of springtime with a semester in Dingle! Arriving in late January, you will see firsthand how our charming coastal village emerges out of its winter hibernation back into the full swing of spring. You will immediately and warmly be welcomed into the community at a time when there are few outside tourists. Spring semester students at SHU in Dingle get to experience life as a true local, marching in the St Patricks Day Parade – always a highlight of the year in Dingle – and hanging out with adorable newborn lambs.

Students studying for a full semester in Dingle get to visit the Blarney Stone, Cork, and London, all included in the program fee, and enjoy ample time for independent travel. As the days get longer, we spend more and more time outside, availing of the many outdoor activities Dingle has to offer, including surfing, kayaking, and horseback riding.

With temperatures ranging from 48F in early February to 60F by May, the springtime weather in Dingle is extremely comfortable and perfect for adventures through the rolling green hills and along our sparkling shores. In addition to receiving tuition in the classroom from our distinguished faculty members, the bustling town and countryside of Dingle will be your springtime campus 

Courses

AN 230 – CULTURE, COMMUNITY AND FOLKLORE
 
 
DESCRIPTION

This course explores the interrelationship of folklore, social life and cultural identity in the West of Ireland.  With special reference to historical and contemporary communities of the Dingle Peninsula, this course also examines the role of folklore in individual and community well-being.

 
FACULTY

Dáithí de Mórdha Ph.D.

BI 104 – INTRO TO COASTAL ECOLOGY OF IRELAND
 

 

DESCRIPTION

This course will introduce students to the varying marine environments surrounding the Dingle Peninsula and their importance, in terms of biodiversity and sustainability. Through multiple field trips and lectures, we will explore many coastal ecosystems, how they are shaped, and the organisms that live in them.

Students are introduced to the abiotic and biotic processes that influence aquatic communities including coastal streams, rocky intertidal zones, sandy beaches, marshes, harbors, and the open ocean.

Throughout the course, we will also discuss how human activities affect these ecosystems, and other topical marine issues.

 

FACULTY

Sharon Ni Shuilleabhain

BI 299/HS 305/EX 255 – NUTRITIONAL ASPECTS OF HUMAN HEALTH & PERFORMANCE
 

 

DESCRIPTION

This course provides an examination of the six classes of nutrients with strong emphasis on chronic disease prevention and improving athletic performance. Issues concerning dietary supplements, functional foods, and the ethics of food choices are also explored.

 
FACULTY

John O’Connor M.Sc

BI 303 – GIS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS
 
 
DESCRIPTION

This course focuses on the development of GIS principles, methods, and techniques that are particularly relevant to and useful for problem solving in environmental analysis and management. Specifically this course has four major components: an overview of selected GIS principles including data models, scale and spatial sampling, and spatial autocorrelation; a review of the major techniques for environmental data acquisition and integration; an introduction to environmental analysis and modeling techniques; and a discussion of several applied areas of environmental modeling techniques as related to coastal ecology, hydrology, natural hazards, natural resources management, and environmental planning.

Prerequisites: BI 202/204 Ecology Lecture and Lab; CH 152/154 General Chemistry II Lecture and Lab, MA 140 Precalculus.

 
FACULTY
John Rapaglia Ph.D.
CIT 202 – CATHOLIC INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS II
 
 
DESCRIPTION

CIT is Sacred Heart University’s academic signature core. It provide students with an interdisciplinary, foundational understanding of the Catholic intellectual tradition from the classical to the contemporary periods. Using seminar pedagogy, it gives students an understanding of the roots and development of the Catholic intellectual tradition as an ongoing, 2,000-year conversation between the Catholic community of thinkers, writers, artists and the cultures in which they have lived, asking fundamental questions about God, humanity, society, and nature.

In addition, it introduces students to fundamental claims of the Catholic Intellectual Tradition; enable students to understand that Tradition as characterized by open, rigorous intellectual inquiry in the context of a faith tradition; engage students and faculty in seminar discussion; and enable students to see the value of this Tradition in the contemporary world help develop students’ reading, writing, and speaking skills.

 
FACULTY

Billy MagFhloin Ph.D.

CM 103/231 – CAPTURING YOUR IRISH ADVENTURES
 
DESCRIPTION

This introductory course will examine the relationship between filmmaker and location. By working with narrative and non-narrative film styles, students will gain exposure and understanding to producing creative content in a foreign country.

Using the student’s emotional experience and study abroad locales, students will create creative pieces that will serve their artistic vision, their fundamental understanding of film production, and the logistical elements of field production.

 
FACULTY
Dara Jauch
 
CM 135/ENG 299 – IRISH CINEMA
 
 
DESCRIPTION

Delivered through a combination of lecture, creative workshop and screening formats, this course examines Irish Cinema in historical, sociocultural, and contemporary contexts, with a particular emphasis on interrogating concepts of Irishness, identity, and tradition.

Included in this course will be an overview of various theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of film, so that students will be provided with an appropriate vocabulary in the academic study of film, making it accessible to students of both Media and other majors.

There will be a particular focus on learning through doing, leading students to critically engage with theoretical concepts through the creation of various audio-visual projects and exercises inspired by Irish film and visual culture.

 
FACULTY
Ciara Barrett Ph.D.
CM 396 – INTERNSHIP
 
DESCRIPTION

The School of Communication, Media & the Arts encourages all Media Studies and Digital Communication majors to experience at least one internship before they graduate, and many majors complete two or three. Not only do students gain valuable experience but they receive academic credit for their internship learning experiences.

In addition to completing internships at top corporate media outlets, some students choose to focus on community outreach and teacher training opportunities depending on their career goals and personal interests. The SHU in Dingle program is an ideal location to experience the many aspects of media and communication training.

 
FACULTY
Dara Jauch
 
ENG 281 – WRITING IDENTITY IN IRELAND
 
 
DESCRIPTION

This workshop in creative writing is designed to encourage English majors’ and Irish Studies minors’ engagement with Irish literature through practice, the exercise of creative ideation, and to develop students’ deeper understanding and appreciation of historical and contemporary Irish literary texts through artistic expression.

Students will read and workshop their ideas about Irish and Irish-American-authored texts in class, which they will then build upon in weekly creative writings tasks. These projects will range from flash fiction to poetry, songwriting to scriptwriting and comic book-writing, which they will also share with each other in class and develop into a writing portfolio.

Unique to the Sacred Heart in Dingle campus, participants of this creative writing workshop will attend a number of readings by local/contemporary authors (who write both in English and Irish) and present their own work in two open mic nights alongside local practitioners. Students will develop an ongoing dialogue on Irish, Irish-American, and outsider identity, through the sharing of their writing and ideas. They will enjoy a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to explore and expand the Irish literary tradition from inside the Dingle literary arts scene.

 
FACULTY

Ciara Barrett Ph.D.

MU 106 – INTRODUCTION TO IRISH MUSIC
 
 
DESCRIPTION

This course provides students with a thorough overview of traditional Irish music, song and dance from their earliest references right up to today’s influence on the world music stage. Aural, as well as some basic traditional musicianship skills, will be developed over the course. Students will experience firsthand the Irish music scene locally.

Attendance at sessions and “céilís” will enable them to savor Traditional music in its natural social setting. The course will study the history and development of the tradition, while also ensuring the students gain a deeper understanding of this tradition by learning some practical skills.

 
FACULTY

Niamh Varian Barry MA

NU 215/215L – HEALTH ASSESSMENT, LECTURE & LAB
 

 

DESCRIPTION

Health Assessment introduces assessment components including interviewing, history taking, functional assessment, and physical examination of adults and geriatric patients with emphasis on health promotion and disease/injury prevention. This course begins with foundational concepts of professionalism, patient-centered care, and safety. Students will build upon learned assessment techniques to begin examining patients using a head-to-toe approach.

Course content focuses on the role of the nurse, inter- and intraprofessional communication, data collection, and patient teaching. Emphasis is placed on the assessment phase of the nursing process. Students are expected to develop critical thinking skills to begin identifying problems and deficits in an effort to guide the development of a plan of care. By the end of the semester, students will formulate a holistic and comprehensive concept map diagramming actual and potential health issues to illustrate this learning.

 
FACULTY
Linda McCarthy MSN

Fiona Barton M.Sc

NU 310 – PATHOPHYSIOLOGY
 

 

DESCRIPTION

This course is designed to promote the understanding and application of fundamental disease processes and disabilities. General concepts of disease, including etiology, morphology and clinical significance are discussed. These concepts are applied in a systems oriented approach to disease processes, and concepts of human genetics will be covered.

 
FACULTY

Mary Dietmann, Ed.D., APRN, ACNS-BC, CNE

TRS 271 – CELTIC RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS
 
 
DESCRIPTION

Study the ancient religion of Ireland, of gods and goddesses, ancestors and rituals, holy places and sacred rulers. Learn about the Celtic origins of Halloween, and the great seasonal festivals of the druids. Walk through the landscape and discover traditions and customs from ancient times that are reflected in the modern world, through myth, place names and customs.

 
FACULTY

Billy MagFhloin Ph.D.

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How to Apply

Tuition & Fees

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